Close harmony singing is, due to its nature of voices only, a risky business. There is no rhythm section, no soundscape of piano or guitar, no effects, no tricks. Just the sound of your voice, fragile on its own. As a close harmony singer, you have to control the delicate art of blending, the power, the emotions…

Once, in an interview, Bart nailed it vividly: “ We all are, voices concerned, naked on stage.” Just that one quote made us loose dozens of fans (laughs)…

Each of us, from their own musical background (rock, choral, worldmusic, classical,…), got attracted to the simplicity and low maintenance attitude of a capella music. More than once we went out on a summer day in the park, just rehearsing, or on a quiet square, and people continued to watch, listen, enjoy. Because we don’t like a complex agenda, heavy instruments, the need for electricity, …

But with the nice and simple concept, comes a genre, difficult to adapt. And the results are worth the work: nothing provides as much satisfaction then to hear a pop song, or a powerfull war song, performed in just four voices, and still pull it off. You get to experience music in its pure
essence…

The art of singing, without tempering of ProTools, AutoTune, VocAlign and other tricks, is a rare and pure art. Is it because of that, that in times of super smooth pop music, sweet computer tunes and almost mathematically styled music, the real art of making pure music has become so rare? The real vocal heroes (Coope, Boyes & Simpson / Ladysmith Black Mambazo / Kings’ Singers / …) often stand in the shadows of the music industry.

Les Voix Perdues certainly didn’t pick an easy and popular music genre: the opportunities are rare, and the performing places are scarce…

These last 10 years we mainly worked on our strong WW1 program; war and peace songs that reach back to the stories of the Great War. Strong warpoetry put to music.

But also the looser, less serious genres become Les Voix Perdues: pop (Crowded House, Bonnie Raitt, Joe Jackson, …), light jazz (Norah Jones, …), crooners (Frank Sinatra, …), gospel, world music and light classical are covered. So this group can perform an evening of WW1-songs, and also have a fun and lighthearted concert!

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